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You can find out more details about Clue's approach to privacy by reading our Privacy Policy

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Gender Equality

Talking about periods: an international investigation findings

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Periods are a health reality for 50% of the world's population. Yet the menstrual cycle is often not discussed in public - because of cultural discomfort, social customs or simply lack of information about the topic.

We wanted to find out more, and why the world feels the way it does about periods. So in November, we polled our incredibly international user base (190 countries and counting!) with the help of the International Women's Health Coalition – an advocacy group in New York which acts as a bold and independent voice for the health and rights of women.

90,000 people responded.

And now, we have completed one of the largest surveys on period perceptions in the world.

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# Explore the result here.

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